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Tag Archives: Historical

Tony

Title: Tony

Author: Ed Galing

Illustrator: Erin E. Stead

Pages: 32 pages

Recommended for: Pre K- 2

Synopsis: A young boy tells the story of his admiration, and friendship, with the local dairy delivery horse.

Although the narrator never reveals himself in the book, you get a sense that he is a young boy, living in the early 1900’s. He tells the story of the local dairy delivery horse named Tony, his owner Tom, and how much he loved getting to see him early every morning. Tony is described in the book as, ” All white, large, sturdy, with wide gentle eyes and a ton of love”. This book is beautifully poetic, with wonderful illustrations. This book has fewer words, but the illustrations definitely make up for that. The soft colors, and almost dream like pencil strokes, make this book hard to put down.

 

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Posted by on February 28, 2017 in Bedtime, Picture Books

 

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The Lost Twin

lost twin 1_Title:The Lost Twin

Author: Sophie Cleverly

Series:Scarlet and Ivy

Pages: 290 pages

Recommended for: 3rd – 6th Grade

Synopsis:After her troublemaking twin, Scarlet, vanishes from Rookwood Boarding School, shy Ivy tries to track her down, using pieces of Scarlet’s journal carefully hidden all over the school for Ivy to find.

Ivy is invited to go to Rookwood Boarding School to take her twin sisters spot at the school.  Ivy doesn’t want to go, but isn’t given a choice.  Once, she gets their the headmistress tells her she has to pretend that she is Scarlet. Ivy knows something is up, but not sure what to do.  She stumbles pieces of her sisters diary and starts to piece together what happened.

This is set in the 1930, but really the only thing that sticks out as different from modern times is that corporal punishment is still allowed.  It is an interesting story and I would read the next in the series, but it was not a book I couldn’t put down. It is even paced and well written.  I like that Ivy is a strong main character, even thought she doesn’t thing she really is.

 

 
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Posted by on June 10, 2016 in Historical, Juv, Mysteries

 

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Resistance

Resistance

Jacket (1)Title:: Resistance
Author: : Carla Jablonski ; illustrated by Leland Purvis ; color by Hilary Sycamore.
Series: Resistance trilogy
Recommended for: Grades 5-9
Pages: Unpaginated
Call Number/Link:  GN J JAB
Synopsis: A couple’s bucolic French town is almost untouched by the ravages of WWII. When their friend goes into hiding and his Jewish parents disappear, they realize they must take a stand.
Review:  This is a tough book, but important. It is about the occupation of France as told from the point of view of children. The authors work hard to make the story gripping without being melodramatic. The excellently capture the fear and uncertainty of war coupled with the power of family. End notes in the book talk a bit more about the war and reasonably discuss the idea that war is filled with shades of grey, explaining some of the ideas as to why people might collaborate with the Nazis.

 

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Ten Days a Madwoman

TEN DAYSTitle:  Ten Days a Madwoman: The Daring Life and Turbulent Times of the Original “Girl” Reporter Nelly Bly
Author: Deborah Noyes
Series:
Recommended for: Grade 5 or 6 and up
Pages: 144
Call Number/Link:  J B Bly, N.

Synopsis:  Daring? Turbulent? Madwoman? When a book’s title includes those words, readers are bound to be inspired to open it. When the book is as well done as this one is, readers will stay through the last page. About half of the narrative is devoted to the 10 days that journalist Nellie Bly spent undercover in an asylum for mentally ill women (and women who were put there unjustly by their families). Given the high drama of these real-life events, the author’s matter-of-fact writing style keeps the narrative from veering toward sensationalism. Passages from Bly’s newspaper article about the experience are threaded into the narrative, thereby keeping her vibrant viewpoint as the dramatic center. The rest of the volume covers Bly’s other exploits, personal and professional: her venture around the world in a record-breaking 72 days, her interview with imprisoned anarchist Emma Goldman, and her own marriage at 31 to septuagenarian millionaire Robert Seaman. The illustrations are a mix of straightforward archival photos and surreal retouched photos à la Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (Quirk, 2011). Because the former are captioned with historical facts and the latter are not captioned at all, it is easy to tell the difference between the actual images and the fanciful. Noyes makes history accessible and irresistible in this thrilling account of women’s lives, flagrant abuse, scandal, courage, and tenacity. The source notes are extensive, and the research is impeccable. VERDICT This excellent work is a natural fit for units on history, biography, and social studies.

I really loved this book.  I’ve started on a quest to find awesome biographies to recommend a this is a great one.  The title caught my attention but the writing and the story kept it.  Few (if any) kids today have even heard the name Nelly Bly.  Which is sad considering what a trailblazer she was for women and how much her stories influenced the world at the time.  The treatment of those in the asylum and of women in general would probably be shocking to a young person today. If we ever get a middle schooler who needs a biography (and hasn’t already picked one) this is a great one to recommend.

 
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Posted by on April 26, 2016 in Juv, Non-Fiction

 

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The Curious World of Calpurnia Tate


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Title: The Curious World of Calpurnia Tate

Author: Jacqueline Kelly

Series: Sequel to The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate

Recommended for: 4th- 8th Grade

Pages: 312 pages

Call Number/Link: J FICTION KELLY, J.

 

 

Synopsis: Callie’s younger brother Travis keeps bringing home strays. And Callie has her hands full keeping the animals—Travis included—away from her mother’s critical eye.


When a storm blows change into town in the form of a visiting veterinarian, Callie discovers a life and a vocation she desperately wants. But with societal expectations as they are, she will need all her wits and courage to realize her dreams.

Whether it’s wrangling a rogue armadillo or stray dog, a guileless younger brother or standoffish cousin, the trials and tribulations of Callie Vee will have readers cheering for this most endearing heroine.

My Recommendations: I love this book and the first book. It is a great historical fiction book for young ladies seeing how difficult it was to just be in the early part of the last century.  It fun to see how she works her way around all the obstacles in her path and doesn’t let her family stand in the way of her goals.  Of course there is a knight in shining armor that is her grandfather and older brother encouraging her along the way.  A great read for older elementary school and middle school children. I read this on audio book in the car so a great book to read over a few weeks time for children and adults.

 

 
 

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Blood, Bullets, and Bones: The Story of Forensic Science from Sherlock Holmes to DNA

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Title: Blood, Bullets, and Bones: The Story of Forensic Science from Sherlock Holmes to DNA
Author: Bridget Heos
Recommended for: 12th Grade and Up
Pages: 264
Call Number/Link:  J 363.25 HEO

Synopsis: “Blood, Bullets, and Bones provides young readers with a fresh and fascinating look at the ever-evolving science of forensics. Since the introduction of DNA testing, forensic science has been in the forefront of the public’s imagination, thanks especially to popular television shows like CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. But forensic analysis has been practiced for thousands of years. Ancient Chinese detectives studied dead bodies for signs of foul play, and in Victorian England, officials used crime scene photography and criminal profiling to investigate the Jack the Ripper murders. In the intervening decades, forensic science has evolved to use the most cutting-edge, innovative techniques and technologies. In this book, acclaimed author Bridget Heos uses real-life cases to tell the history of modern forensic science, from the first test for arsenic poisoning to fingerprinting, firearm and blood spatter analysis, DNA evidence, and all the important milestones in between. By turns captivating and shocking, Blood, Bullets, and Bones demonstrates the essential role forensic science has played in our criminal justice system”– Provided by publisher.

My Thoughts: Blood, Bullets, and Bones is a curious book. In terms of reading level, it would be accessible for middle schoolers, or even advanced elementary students. In terms of content, however, this book lands squarely in the advanced high school or post-secondary category. Blood, Bullets, and Bones details the history of forensic science, illustrating many of the important scientific advances with actual cases.
These crimes, including those of Jack the Ripper and other serial killers, are described in somewhat graphic detail and some include descriptions of rape cases; arson; adultery, and other inappropriate relationships, one of which involves a 34-year-old man’s inappropriate relationship with a (later murdered) teenaged girl. Some of the other murder cases involve young teenagers, either as rape and/or murder victims, perpetrators, or both.
Much of the scientific and historic information in this book may be useful for academic study. Moreover, footnotes are plentiful, and there is an extensive bibliography. That being said, I would have a difficult time recommending this to anyone but an advanced high school or even college student pursuing a career in forensic criminology, as the disturbing content will almost certainly be too much for younger readers.

 
 

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The Princess Spy


princess spyTitle: The Princess Spy

Author: Melanie Dickerson
Series: Fairy Tales Romance #5
Recommended for:  8th grade and Up
Pages: 293
Call Number/Link:  TEEN FICTION DICKERSON, M.

 

Synopsis: Margaretha has always been a romantic, and hopes her newest suitor, Lord Claybrook, is destined to be her one true love. But then an injured man is brought to Hagenheim Castle, claiming to be an English lord who was attacked by Claybrook and left for dead. And only Margaretha—one of the few who speaks his language—understands the wild story. Margaretha finds herself unable to pass Colin’s message along to her father, the duke, and convinces herself ‘Lord Colin’ is just an addled stranger. Then Colin retrieves an heirloom she lost in a well, and asks her to spy on Claybrook as repayment. Margaretha knows she could never be a spy—not only is she unable to keep anything secret, she’s sure Colin is completely wrong about her potential betrothed. Though when Margaretha overhears Claybrook one day, she discovers her romantic notions may have been clouding her judgment about not only Colin but Claybrook as well. It is up to her to save her father and Hagenheim itself from Claybrook’s wicked plot.

Review: I thought this was just such a refreshing book. This author retells classic fairy tales with historical details. Since it is a Christian book series it had all the elements of a classic fairy tale in that it does not have foul language, and it alluded to many different relationships without going into detail.  Truly a clean and fun addition to the series.  I would recommend this to young girls looking for fairy tales but that are fun and interesting.  This story always keep you engaged, wanting more.  It is fairly short and a quick read.  You could recommend to younger middle schoolers if they wanted more mature content without the details.  I look forward to reading other novels in the series since it ties in all the different characters so well and give information about each character.

 
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Posted by on March 17, 2015 in Fairy Tales, Historical, Romance, Teen

 

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