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Tag Archives: families

A Night Divided

Title: A Night Divided
Author: Jennifer Nielsen
Series: N/A
Recommended for:
Pages: 317 pages
Call Number/Link: J FICTION NIELSEN, J.

Synopsis: When the Berlin Wall went up, Gerta, her mother, and her brother Fritz are trapped on the eastern side where they were living, while her father, and her other brother Dominic are in the West–four years later, now twelve, Gerta sees her father on a viewing platform on the western side and realizes he wants her to risk her life trying to tunnel to freedom.

A neighbor told me that I needed to read this book, he was right.  I have read other books by the author and like her writing style. Before reading this book, I knew very little on the subject. This has prompted me to read more.  The story allowed you to see how the government pitted everyone against each other.  My only complaint is that realistically Gerta would have been caught right away.  I didn’t feel that she hid what she was doing all that well.  This book did make me want to learn more about true stories of people crossing.

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Posted by on September 30, 2017 in Historical, Juv

 

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Meet the Bigfeet

meet-the-bigfeet book cover

Title:   Meet the Bigfeet
Author:   Kevin Sherry
Series:   The Yeti Files
Recommended for:  kids in grades 1-5 would enjoy this book.  The actual “reading level” is third grade.
Pages:   122 p.
Call Number/Link:  J FICTION SHERRY, K.

 

Rating:   *****

 

 

 

Synopsis:

Blizz Richards is a great guy, a caring boss, and a loyal friend. Oh, yeah…he’s also a yeti! He’s made it his life’s mission to study cryptids like him, hidden animals who have taken a powerful oath to never be seen by the outside world. So when a photo of Cousin Brian becomes a media sensation, Brian can’t handle the guilt and disappears. But it’s time for the annual Bigfoot family reunion, and it won’t be the same without him. Luckily, Blizz and his devoted team are on the case. Can they find their furry friend before their secret gets out for good?

Comments:

I loved this book.  It is so much fun!  Blizz Richards is such a great guy – uh, cryptid.  I also liked all of the other characters, except for the villain.  I wish I could go to the Bigfoot family reunion!

Meet the Bigfeet is an illustrated chapter book – the humorous illustrations really added to the book.  It would be a good choice for kids who would like to read Diary of a Wimpy Kid who are a bit too young for it, either because they read at a lower level or aren’t ready for the middle school dynamics.

In no way, shape or form would this book be considered serious literature.  That is part of the reason that I liked it so much!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
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Posted by on August 24, 2016 in Adventure, Fantasy, Funny, Juv

 

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Into the Dim

intothedimTitle: Into the Dim
Author: Janet B. Taylor
Series: first book in series
Recommended for: 7th grade and up
Pages: 425 pages
Call Number/Link:  TEEN FICTION TAYLOR, J. 

Synopsis: Sixteen-year-old Hope Walton travels back in time to help rescue her mother, a member of the secret society of time travelers, who is trapped in twelfth-century England in the age of Eleanor of Aquitaine.

I like the whole time travel aspect, but this book was just ok.  I almost didn’t finish the book because I just wasn’t interested.  I was not big on the main character, who in the beginning is portrayed as weak and has tons of phobias, but then all of a sudden she is able to overcome all her phobias.  I really wouldn’t recommend the book.

 
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Posted by on April 21, 2016 in Sci-Fi, Teen

 

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Who We Are! All about being the same and being different

Jacket[1] (2)

Title: Who We Are! All about being the same and being different
Author: Robie H. Harris
Series: Let’s Talk About You and Me
Recommended for: K- 2nd grade
Pages: 40
Call Number/Link:  E 158.2 HAR

Synopsis: Join Nellie, Gus, baby Jake, and their parents at Funland as they go on rides, watch performers, and play games along with many other children and grown-ups. As they enjoy their excursion, they notice that people are the same as one another in lots of ways, and different in lots of ways too. Accessible, humorous, family-filled illustrations; conversations between Gus and Nellie; and straightforward text come together to help children realize why it’s important to treat others the way they want to be treated and the way you want to be treated whether a person is a lot like you or different from you, a good friend or someone you have just met or seen for the first time. (from the catalog)

Review:  I had mixed feelings about this book.  I loved the illustrations throughout the entire book. They showed all types of families who are from all different racial, ethnic, and religious backgrounds, as well as some people with physical challenges. The text discusses how people are basically the same even though they are different in many ways.  It describes many ways people are different.  Unfortunately the text on each page goes on and on and on.  It would make a great read aloud for kids if it had only 1/3 of the words!  You could use the illustrations to start conversations about differences.  Currently it is too long and very boring.  But the pictures are fantastic!

 
 

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Dust of Eden

Dust of edenTitle:Dust of Eden
Author: Mariko Nagai
Series: N/A
Recommended for: 4th – 8th Grade
Pages: 121 pages
Call Number/Link:  J FICTION NAGAI, M.

Synopsis:”Thirteen-year-old Mina Tagawa and her Japanese-American family are forced to evacuate their Seattle home and are relocated to an internment camp in Idaho, where they live for three years”– Provided by publisher.

I am an avid fantasy reader, but this book caught my attention while I was fixing shelves. I highly recommend this book as it takes a look at a subject that is not really talked about. It is told in verse so it is a short read, but does a great job of showing Mina’s feelings.  After reading about this family’s  experience I want to do some research and actually read some nonfiction books to learn more.  I feel that if a class is learning about World War II, that this is a good book that can be brought in as a different look World War II.  Weedflower by Cynthia Kadohata, A Diamond in the Desert by Kathryn Fitzmaurice and Dash by Kirby Larson are other fiction books that cover Japanese-American Internment camps.

 
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Posted by on March 12, 2016 in Historical, Juv

 

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The Siren

The siren

 

Title:     The Siren

Author:   Kiera Cass

Series: N/A

Recommended for:   Ages 13-17

Pages:   336

Call Number/Link:  Teen Fiction Cass, K.

Synopsis:   Kahlen is a Siren, bound to serve the Ocean by luring humans to watery graves with her voice, which is deadly to any human who hears it. Akinli is human—a kind, handsome boy who’s everything Kahlen ever dreamed of. Falling in love puts them both in danger…but Kahlen can’t bear to stay away. Will she risk everything to follow her heart?

This was such a spellbinding book.  I loved the way she writes the character so heart felt.  She is unique and feels so many things and does not know why until she asks the Ocean more questions.  The twists and turns keeps you on the edge of your seat and you will never guess the ending.  Surprising what people keep hidden because they just don’t think it’s possible.  Can’t wait to for the sequel to see where she takes it, there are so many possibilities.  A great read for 8th grade and beyond.

 
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Posted by on February 8, 2016 in Fairy Tales, Fantasy, Romance, Teen, Uncategorized

 

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Princess Pistachio

Princess Pistachio cover

Title:   Princess Pistachio
Author:   Marie-Louise Gay
Series:   Princess Pistachio
Recommended for:   children who are just transitioning to chapter books – either as readers or listeners
Pages:   46 pages
Call Number/Link:  J FICTION GAY, M.

Rating:   ***

 

 

 

 

Synopsis:

“When she receives a mysterious crown for her birthday, Pistachio realizes that she is really an abducted princess.  But this only makes her parents sigh, her friends laugh, and her baby sister Penny insist on playing princess too.  When Pistachio’s angry wish makes Penny disappear, she needs a princess’s courage to get her back.”

Comments:

I was conflicted whether this was a beginning chapter book or an early reader.  After some thought, I decided to keep it in juvenile fiction.

I enjoyed the book but didn’t absolutely adore it.  Pistachio has a wonderful imagination and we have similar ideas of what life should be like as royalty.  The cute illustrations were a nice bonus.

The book stays rooted in reality despite Pistachio’s imagination and is more about family relationships than royalty.  Thus, it’s not exactly for the child who “wants a book about princesses.”  The exception would be if the child wants to read about princess wannabes who don’t get what they want.

 

 
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Posted by on December 31, 2015 in Juv, Realistic

 

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