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Category Archives: Sci-Fi

Warcross

Title: Warcross
Author: Marie Lu
Series: Warcross #1
Recommended for: 6th grade and up
Pages: 353 pages
Call Number/Link:  TEEN FICTION LU, M.
Synopsis: For the millions who log in every day, Warcross isn’t just a game—it’s a way of life. The obsession started ten years ago and its fan base now spans the globe, some eager to escape from reality and others hoping to make a profit. Struggling to make ends meet, teenage hacker Emika Chen works as a bounty hunter, tracking down Warcross players who bet on the game illegally. But the bounty-hunting world is a competitive one, and survival has not been easy. To make some quick cash, Emika takes a risk and hacks into the opening game of the international Warcross Championships—only to accidentally glitch herself into the action and become an overnight sensation.

Convinced she’s going to be arrested, Emika is shocked when instead she gets a call from the game’s creator, the elusive young billionaire Hideo Tanaka, with an irresistible offer. He needs a spy on the inside of this year’s tournament in order to uncover a security problem . . . and he wants Emika for the job. With no time to lose, Emika’s whisked off to Tokyo and thrust into a world of fame and fortune that she’s only dreamed of. But soon her investigation uncovers a sinister plot, with major consequences for the entire Warcross empire.

Comments: This is a interesting dystiopian where gaming has become a part of everyones life, by wearing special glasses you earn points for just about everything.  The game itself is like capture the flag, except that you are in a virtual world where steping stones disappear, and just about anything can happen.  I am not a gammer, so I think the world set up seemed well done.  I would be interested to hear someones view who is a gamer. I will say that I was able to figure out early on who the mysterious hacker was, but I am not sure of motive.  I am very interested in what the next book will bring.

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Posted by on November 29, 2017 in Sci-Fi, Teen

 

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Satellite

Title: Satellite
Author: Nick Lake
Series: N/A
Recommended for: 7th grade and up
Pages: 464
Call Number/Link:  Teen Fiction Lake

Synopsis: He’s going to a place he’s never been before: home.

Moon 2 is a space station that orbits approximately 250 miles above Earth. It travels 17,500 miles an hour, making one full orbit every ninety minutes. It’s also the only home that fifteen-year-old Leo and two other teens have ever known.

Born and raised on Moon 2, Leo and the twins, Orion and Libra, are finally old enough and strong enough to endure the dangerous trip to Earth. They’ve been “parented” by teams of astronauts since birth and have run countless drills to ready themselves for every conceivable difficulty they might face on the flight.

But has anything really prepared them for life on terra firma? Because while the planet may be home to billions of people, living there is more treacherous than Leo and his friends could ever have imagined, and their very survival will mean defying impossible odds.

Review: For the most part, I really enjoyed this book. It was an interesting concept of what home is & what would happen if you’re born in space. After spending 16 years in a space station and suddenly coming “home”, the process of adapting to earth is no small feat. Gravity alone is enough to take on, but throw in all the sensations such of wind, sun, rain, etc and all the people…and well it’s overwhelming to say the least. And that’s not even considering all the germs their bodies had never been exposed to! Of course, no one could have predicted how hard it would be to come back to earth–not only mentally/socially but also physically. No one has ever spent that much time in zero gravity and they had no idea what to expect. Now, throw in government experiments and cover-ups and things get even more complicated.

The only thing I really hated was the text speak. The constant u, i, c, & dr8 were jarring to say the least. I”m still not sure *why* Lake decided to do it that way beyond  maybe thinking it was cool? The teens obviously smart and I would have assumed they knew basic grammar. I am far from someone who is grammar crazy, but it was enough that I would have abandoned the book if I wasn’t reading it for review. While I have not heard the audio, I would recommend readers tackling that over print. That way you get the interesting story without the annoying text talk.

 
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Posted by on October 16, 2017 in Sci-Fi, Teen

 

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A Thousand Pieces of You

Title: A Thousand Pieces of You
Author: Claudia Gray
Series: Firebird
Recommended for: Grades 9-12
Pages: 384 pages
Call Number/Link:  TEEN FICTION GRAY, C.

Synopsis: Marguerite Caine’s physicist parents are known for their groundbreaking achievements. Their most astonishing invention, called the Firebird, allows users to jump into multiple universes—and promises to revolutionize science forever. But then Marguerite’s father is murdered, and the killer—her parent’s handsome, enigmatic assistant Paul—escapes into another dimension before the law can touch him.

Marguerite refuses to let the man who destroyed her family go free. So she races after Paul through different universes, always leaping into another version of herself. But she also meets alternate versions of the people she knows—including Paul, whose life entangles with hers in increasingly familiar ways. Before long she begins to question Paul’s guilt—as well as her own heart. And soon she discovers the truth behind her father’s death is far more sinister than she expected.

Thoughts:  The book was ok.  I really didn’t care what happened for most of the book.  They talked about dimension and the main characters were a little different in the different dimensions.  I am not sure that I care enough to will finish the series. Marguerite and friend Theo use firebirds (device used to jump dimensions) to chase after Paul, who they think betrayed them. They jump five times in the book, each time they jump they have to figure out their surroundings, and the role they play in this dimension.  A lot of time is spent on the dimensions, which is interesting. I guess my biggest thing is I didn’t feel like I connected with any of the characters.

 
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Posted by on July 25, 2017 in Dystopian, Sci-Fi, Teen

 

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Maze Runner

Title: Maze Runner
Author: James Dashner
Series: Maze Runner
Recommended for: 6th Grade and up
Pages: 375 Pages
Call Number/Link:  TEEN FICTION DASHNER, J.

Synopsis: Sixteen-year-old Thomas wakes up with no memory in the middle of a maze and realizes he must work with the community in which he finds himself if he is to escape.

I enjoyed the book, it has a similar feel to the dystopians that came out at the same time.  This book has adventure, danger, and a mystery to solve. Right from the beginning Thomas is trying to figure out what is going on and he has to draw stuff out of the Gladers to pieces together the situation. At first I thought they weren’t saying what was going on, because they were secretive, but it really comes down to most of them had no clue.  At times it could be slow, but I feel that the author was giving you more insight to what some of these boys felt having been in the glade for years. I have already started the next book so I can figure out what happened to the world.  This is part of three book series with two prequel books.

 

 
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Posted by on June 12, 2017 in Dystopian, Sci-Fi, Teen

 

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Nemesis

Title: Nemesis
Author: Brendan Reichs
Series: Project Nemesis
Recommended for: Grade 7 & up
Pages: 443
Call Number/Link:  Teen Fiction Reichs, B.

Synopsis: He killed me. He killed me not. He killed me.

It’s been happening since Min was eight. Every two years, on her birthday, a strange man finds her and murders her in cold blood. But hours later, she wakes up in a clearing just outside her tiny Idaho hometown—alone, unhurt, and with all evidence of the horrifying crime erased.

Across the valley, Noah just wants to be like everyone else. But he’s not. Nightmares of murder and death plague him, though he does his best to hide the signs. But when the world around him begins to spiral toward panic and destruction, Noah discovers that people have been lying to him his whole life. Everything changes in an eye blink.

For the planet has a bigger problem. The Anvil, an enormous asteroid threatening all life on Earth, leaves little room for two troubled teens. Yet on her sixteenth birthday, as she cowers in her bedroom, hoping not to die for the fifth time, Min has had enough. She vows to discover what is happening in Fire Lake and uncovers a lifetime of lies: a vast conspiracy involving the sixty-four students of her sophomore class, one that may be even more sinister than the murders.

Review: This book had such a great premise. However, it utterly and completely failed. After reading 400+ pages, I still can’t tell you WHAT is going on. I’m not sure the author/book quite has an idea as well. It was a bit like reading whiplash to be honest. One moment we’re trying to figure out if she’s having psychotic breaks then we’re at conspiracy theories and then we end at…well, I’m not quite sure where we end up. But it’s doesn’t make much sense. And perhaps in book two, more will be revealed/it’ll make sense, but I’m not sure I want to even wade in that world again. There may be some teens who love this head-spin tale, but for most I think this book will them simply frustrated.

 
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Posted by on May 31, 2017 in Sci-Fi, Teen

 

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Into the Dim

intothedimTitle: Into the Dim
Author: Janet B. Taylor
Series: first book in series
Recommended for: 7th grade and up
Pages: 425 pages
Call Number/Link:  TEEN FICTION TAYLOR, J. 

Synopsis: Sixteen-year-old Hope Walton travels back in time to help rescue her mother, a member of the secret society of time travelers, who is trapped in twelfth-century England in the age of Eleanor of Aquitaine.

I like the whole time travel aspect, but this book was just ok.  I almost didn’t finish the book because I just wasn’t interested.  I was not big on the main character, who in the beginning is portrayed as weak and has tons of phobias, but then all of a sudden she is able to overcome all her phobias.  I really wouldn’t recommend the book.

 
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Posted by on April 21, 2016 in Sci-Fi, Teen

 

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MARTians

MArtians

Title:  MARTians

Author:  Blythe Woolston
Series:
Recommended for: 8th grade and up
Pages:  216
Call Number/Link: MARTians

Synopsis:  Last girl Zoë Zindleman, numerical ID 009-99-9999, is starting work at AllMART, where “your smile is the AllMART welcome mat.” Her living arrangements are equally bleak: she can wait for her home to be foreclosed and stripped of anything valuable now that AnnaMom has moved away, leaving Zoë behind, or move to the Warren, an abandoned strip-mall-turned-refuge for other left-behinds. With a handful of other disaffected, forgotten kids, Zoë must find her place in a world that has consumed itself beyond redemption. She may be a last girl, but her name means “life,” and Zoë isn’t ready to disappear into the AllMART abyss. Zoë wants to live.

Imagine a world run by WalMart.  Schools, government, everything is run by the corporation.  It’s a future made even eerier by it’s familiarity.  Woolston has taken consumerism to it’s logical conclusion and it leads to a world where everyone works for one of the ‘Marts).  If you have ‘potential’ you work in the store.  If you don’t (or if you question the system) you could end up on a ship harvesting plastic in and ocean garbage patch, or something worse.  The bits and pieces of details about this world that Woolston doles out are fascinating and thought provoking.  This isn’t an action packed dystopian like Divergent.  For teens who like interesting and thoughtful books with a dash of snark.  Similar to ‘Feed’ by M. T. Anderson, ‘Unwind’ by Neal Schusterman, and ‘Material Girls’ by Elaine Dimpoulos.

 
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Posted by on March 2, 2016 in Dystopian, Sci-Fi

 

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