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Category Archives: Concepts

Stack the Cats

Title:   Stack the Cats
Author:   Susie Ghahremani
Series:   —
Recommended for:   toddlers and preschoolers as a readaloud and counting book, early elementary school students because it’s a fairly early reader and teaches alternate ways to organize sets
Pages:   32 pages
Call Number/Link:  E GHAHREMANI, S.

Rating:   ****

 

 

Synopsis:

Cats of all shapes and sizes scamper, yawn, and stretch across the pages of this playful counting book. And every now and then, some of them pile into the purrfect cat stack!

Comments:

This is such a cute book!  The cats are adorable and remind me a little of my hero Pusheen.  The bold, colorful illustrations could work well with a group of children.

It makes me happy that the book works on more than one level.  For toddlers, it is a book with cute cats having fun.  For preschoolers, it is also a counting book.  There is also slightly trickier math for the early elementary school students when sets are regrouped (or divided).  This happens when 6 cats are divided into two groups of 3 cats and 9 cats are divided into three groups of 3 cats.

 

 
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Posted by on May 18, 2017 in Concepts, Picture Books

 

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Plant the Tiny Seed

plant-the-tiny-seed

Title:   Plant the Tiny Seed
Author:   Christie Matheson
Series:   —
Recommended for:  children ages 6 and under
Pages:    32 p.
Call Number/Link:  E MATHESON, C.

Rating:   *** 1/2

 

 
Synopsis:

Plant a seed to watch it grow. Press on the cloud to make it rain. Jiggle the book to scatter the seeds. Interactive text teaches very young children how flowers sprout and mature. Contains watercolor depictions of a flower in various stages of growth” – – provided by publisher.

 

Comments:

Cute gardening book for young children.  Interactive, like the author’s book Tap the Magic Tree.

Great for preschool storytimes with gardening or spring theme.  Could also use for a bee or butterfly storytime.  It could also work for Toddler Time if the children in attendance skew a little older and wouldn’t be too confused by the interactive aspect of the book.

Would work well for one-on-one reading to toddlers and up.

 

 

 
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Posted by on February 7, 2017 in Concepts, Picture Books

 

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Plant the Tiny Seed

plant-the-tiny-seed

 

Title: Plant the Tiny Seed

Author: Christie Mathson

Series: N/A

Recommended for: Preschool – 3rd grade

Pages: 40

Call Number/Link: E MATHESON, C.

Synopsis:  How do you make a garden grow? In this playful companion to the popular Tap the Magic Tree and Touch the Brightest Star, you will see how tiny seeds bloom into beautiful flowers. And by tapping, clapping, waving, and more, young readers can join in the action! Christie Matheson masterfully combines the wonder of the natural world with the interactivity of reading.

Beautiful collage-and-watercolor art follows the seed through its entire life cycle, as it grows into a zinnia in a garden full of buzzing bees, curious hummingbirds, and colorful butterflies. Children engage with the book as they wiggle their fingers to water the seeds, clap to make the sun shine after rain, and shoo away a hungry snail. Appropriate for even the youngest child, Plant the Tiny Seed is never the same book twice—no matter how many times you read it!

And for curious young nature lovers, a page of facts about seeds, flowers, and the insects and animals featured in the book is included at the end. Fans of Press Here, Eric Carle, and Lois Ehlert will find their next favorite book in Plant the Tiny Seed.

My thoughts: I think this book was so cute and had great rhyming sentences.  It is very interactive and would be perfect for any storytime: lapsit, toddler, preschool or Family.  I like the fact that the children can participate by doing an action for each page, while the colors and illustrations are engaging while covering a science topic.  Great book for parents or any type of teachers that want to teach how plants grow.

 

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Colors

colors-shanti-sparrow-book-cover

Title:   Colors
Author:   Shanti Sparrow
Series:   —
Recommended for:   babies and toddlers
Pages:   20
Call Number/Link:  E TINY SPARROW, S.

Rating:  *****

 

 

Synopsis:

Pink flamingos, white Arctic foxes, a yellow lion, and gorgeous black swans: journey through Shanti Sparrow’s enchanting world of colors and animals. Blending beautiful patterns and textures with vibrant hues and bold shapes, Sparrow creates magical, distinctive illustrations that will captivate children and adults alike. The gorgeous design and retro, graphic style make an eye-catching introduction to some of nature’s most fascinating creatures.

Comments:

I loved the vivid colors in this book’s illustrations.  I loved them so much that I did not obsess over the purple owl or blue wolf (too much).  I look forward to seeing the author’s concept book about shapes!

 
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Posted by on December 17, 2016 in Concepts, Picture Books

 

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Aveluz/Firebird

 

Titlaveluze: Aveluz: el secreto de las nubes / Firebird: he lived for the sunshine

Author: Brent McCorkle / Amy Parker

Series: N/A

Recommended for: Preschool to 3rd grade

Pages: 32

Call Number/Link:  SPA E MCCORKLE, B.

 

Synopsis: Firebird is a bright orange baby Oriole who just loves the sunshine. But whenever a storm blows in, he frets and asks Mama why God allows the rain to take the sun away. When Firebird is finally old enough, his mother gently instructs him to fly up through the thunder and lightning to see what’s on the other side. It’s a rough flight and just when he’s about to give up, Firebird rises above the storm to discover the sun shining where it always had been. Firebird is a children’s book that parallels the life of Samantha Crawford, a storybook artist in the inspirational film Unconditional, who lost sight of God’s love and discovered it again.

It was a supercute book that explained what happens when it storms to a small child, it uses a very impressive method that the mommy bird explains to her baby bird.  I think this would be a great book for a parent to read to their child, read for a children’s church class, etc.  The fact that this book is bilingual manageble sentences in English and Spanish is a plus and with beautiful illustrations.

 
 

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The Little Engine That Could

Title:  The Little Engine That Could
Author:   Watty Piper
Recommended for: Preschool and up
Call Number/Link:   E PIPER,W.

Synopsis:   The Little Engine That Could is an illustrated children’s book that was first published in the United States in 1930 by Platt & Munk. The story is used to teach children the value of optimism and hard work.

Comments:   This has been one of my favorite children’s stories.  “I think I can, I think I can” a phrase that has instilled hard work and perseverance in young children.

I love this book because of the sense of accomplishment this little engine has after he has made it over the mountain.

 

 

 

Max & Ruby’s Preschool Pranks

Preschool Pranks cover

Title:   Max & Ruby’s Preschool Pranks
Author:   Rosemary Wells
Series:   Max & Ruby
Recommended for:   I think ages 4-7 would find this book funniest
Pages:   unpaged
Call Number/Link:   E Wells, R.

Rating:   ***

Synopsis:

“Max‘s big sister Ruby and her best friend Louise play school with their younger siblings”– Provided by publisher.

 

Comments:

I think Ruby might be the bossiest big sister ever, although her friend Louise is in close competition.  It always makes me so happy when Max outwits her.  Go Max!

This book seems best for independent or one-on-one reading rather than use in a large group.

It could be fun for the grown-up and child reading the book to make their own volcano afterwards.  They could also try different substances in the volcano to see which combination(s) worked best.  If they’re really brave, they could include everything that Max and Lily put in their volcano.  I’m unconvinced that their concoction would actually “explode,” but it could be interesting to see what (if anything) happens.

The flaps are cute and add to the story.  They are kind of fun, but they aren’t FUN.  (However, erupting volcanoes are FUN.)

 

 
 

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